Delinquent Girl Boss: Worthless to Confess

Delinquent Girl Boss: Worthless to Confess

Toei Company, Japan, 1971
AKA: Zubekô Banchô: Zange No Neuchi Mo Nai/Delinquent Girl Boss: Unworthy of Penance
Director: Kazuhiko Yamaguchi
Writer: Norio Miyashita, Kazuhiko Yamaguchi
Cast: Reiko Oshida, Junzaburô Ban, Nobuo Kaneko, Yumiko Katayama, Yukie Kagawa, Tsunehiko Watase, Ichirô Nakatani, Tonpei Hidari, Yôko Ichiji, Shizuko Kasagi, Masumi Tachibana, Mieko Tsudoi

I realize I left out part 3, Delinquent Girl Boss: Ballad of the Yokohama Hoods. It’s supposed to be in my collection but for some reason, I couldn’t find it. So here is part 4, and I will write about part 3 when I find it. When I watched Delinquent Girl Boss: Tokyo Drifters I first wasn’t sure whether it was supposed to be a sequel to the first film or if it was a remake. There were differences but there were also many themes that existed in both films even though they were partially reworked.

When watching DGB: Worthless to Confess, I realize Yamaguchi is using the same story over and over but toying with different variations. This time as always, the story begins with Rika being an inmate at Akagi Girls School for Juvenile Delinquents. There is a viewing of what is supposed to be an educational film but instead is a violent action movie with a very popular actor, and when the principal stops the film the girls are upset on the verge of rioting. Then comes the “bath scene” where the girls undress and goes into the pool. In DGB: Blossoming Night Dreams there is a big fight in the bath house where all the girls are involved, in DGB: Tokyo Drifters the girls riot when the physician acts like a creep and tries to force the pregnant girl to undress against her will. The fight in the bath is now all the girls against the female guard who is stripped on her keys and her clothes and thrown in the pool, as the girls stage the mass escape. In DGB: Worthless to Confess, there is only a small altercation between two of the girls. In all 3 films Rika is released one year later, but instead of getting jobs at a dry cleaner or a toy factory where her supervisors try to get into her pants, she goes straight to the nice honest person that takes her in. This time it’s no Madame (club owner or head of street vendor clan) but a Master. Rika moves in with Mr. Muraki, the father of Midori, her cellmate at Akagi, and she get a job in his car shop. Midori and her father are estranged, but Rika tries to make peace between them. Midori’s boyfriend is yakuza and he is one of the family trying to pressure her father for money.

Another of the girls from Akagi, Mari, has big problems. Her husband is yakuza and has been in jail for many years where he became very ill, and his former friends doesn’t help out so Mari must try to make money enough by posing for nude paintings. She is pregnant so she doesn’t know for how long she can go on. Instead of street vendor Bon, who was Rikas love interest and the son of Madame, we now have a truckdriver who is also the younger brother of Mari’s ill husband.

When Rika learns that the yakuza has blackmailed Mr. Muraki and taken 3000 yen from him she goes there and asks to have the money back. She says she will do anything they want if they return the money. They tell her to strip naked but before she loses her underwear Midori interferes. Just like in DGB: Blossoming Night Dreams the yakuza is willing to trade the girls for land. This time from Mr. Muraki.

Muraki goes there and reveals to the yakuza that he used to be one of them. In fact he once cut their leader across the face with a razor. When they learn who he is they get afraid and let him take the girls with him. Midori leaves her boyfriend and is moving back home. (This mirrors Bons homecoming to Madame in the second Rika-film.) Mari’s husband tells the boss of the yakuza that Mari is pregnant and that he wants out. He is asked to carry out one last job – to murder Mr. Muraki. He is getting paid 3000 yen for the job. The same 3000 that was taken from Muraki. He tries to stab Muraki with a knife, but even though he is very drunk, Muraki manages to take the knife from his hand. Yakuza then kills both of them.

Rika and the other girls vows to avenge Muraki and just as they did in DGB: Tokyo Drifters, they dress up in red matching trench coats and do “the march of death” to the yakuza headquarters for the final showdown.

If DGB: Tokyo Drifters was lighter, more of a comedy version of the Rika-saga, DGB: Worthless to Confess, is darker again. I’d say it’s the darkest of the three I’ve seen. This doesn’t mean it’s no fun at all. While the swordfight between the girls and the yakuza was chaotic in the first film it’s choreographed this time. One of the girls have a sudden nip slip in the middle of it all and one of the others shouts “Senmitsu, Your boobs!” and helps her put them back, Katanas still cutting everything close enough around them.

My verdict: 5 out of 10.

The Night Visitor

The Night Visitor

Hemisphere Pictures, Glazier, USA, Sweden, Panama, 1971
AKA: Lunatic, Salem Come to Supper
Director: Laslo Benedek
Writer: Guy Elmes, Samuel Roeca
Cast: Max von Sydow, Trevor Howard, Liv Ullmann, Per Oscarsson, Rupert Davies, Andrew Keir, Jim Kennedy, Arthur Hewlett, Hanne Bork, Gretchen Franklin, Bjørn Watt-Boolsen, Lotte Freddie, Erik Kühnau

Salem is in an asylum for the criminally insane, convicted of the axemurder of a farmhand. He claims he is innocent, that he was framed by his sister and her husband, and that he was misrepresented by his lawyer. At the trial his lawer changed the plea from not guilty to guilty by reason of insanity at the last minute, and thus getting Salem off jail but still locked away.

Two years after the trial things start to get weird at the farm where his two sisters, Emmie and Ester, and his brother in law, Dr. Anton Jenks, still live. There is some tension between the sisters as Anton and Ester wants to sell the family farm, while Emmie refuses. Ester and Anton owns one third and also controls Salems part, but Emmie still owns one third so they can’t really do anything unless they can make her change her mind, or if she would die and leave her part to Ester.

Dr. Jenks get called away to a house nearby where the daughter has been found dead in her bed. He can see she has ben strangled and when he opens his bag there are hypodermic needles and sedatives missing but for some reason they have been exchanged for several of his own ties. He suspect his wife for this and confront her when he gets back home. Their parrot drives him mad by repeating “Hit him Anton” over and over but when he throws the cage to the floor the parrot gets loose.

Anton claims he saw Salem standing in a closet when chasing the parrot. He believes Salem somehow has found a way to sneak out from the asylum at night and then sneak back in again. Maybe to get revenge and hurt the people responsible for putting him there in the first place. Ester doesn’t know what to believe and starts to doubt she can trust her husbands sanity.

Salem is a skilled chess player, and at the asylum he plays with one of the wardens. In The Seventh Seal Max von Sydow portraits a knight who plays chess with Death. The Seventh Seal was of course directed by Ingmar Bergman who is the father of Liv Ullmans daughter Linn. In Troell’s The Emigrants and The New Land von Sydow and Ullman plays husband and wife. To americans von Sydow is probably most known as Father Merrin from The Exorcist. He never played chess with the Devil though.

The Night Visitor is a straight forward told story, even if there is some sort of twist a la Edgar Allan Poe at the end. There is also a lot of Max von Sydow running in the snow in his underwear.

My verdict: 6 out of 10.